19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (2023)

Gardening

By

David Beaulieu

19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (1)

David Beaulieu

David Beaulieu is a landscaping expert and plant photographer, with 20 years of experience.

Learn more about The Spruce'sEditorial Process

Updated on 04/27/23

Reviewed by

Kathleen Miller

19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (2)

Reviewed byKathleen Miller

Kathleen Miller is a highly-regarded Master Gardener and horticulturist with over 30 years of experience in organic gardening, farming, and landscape design. She founded Gaia's Farm and Gardens,aworking sustainable permaculture farm, and writes for Gaia Grows, a local newspaper column.

Learn more about The Spruce'sReview Board

19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (3)

Ivy can be a ground cover, grown entirely for their ability to create a blanket of greenery, a climbing vine with striking variegation, or enjoyed as houseplants and/or in hanging pots with colorful flowers or fall foliage. The many types of ivy in existence have led to this range of uses.

To be classified as a true ivy, a plant must belong to Hedera, a genus in the Araliaceae family. But limiting our survey to this strict definition would eliminate a number of useful and beautiful plants commonly referred to as "ivy." So as not to exclude any great "ivies," we'll be including on our list plants that hail from other genera.

Hedera and Parthenocissus are the two most widely grown ivies in landscaping. The major difference between them is that types of the former are evergreen, while types of the latter are deciduous and give you great fall color. Both do best in fertile, moist soil that drains well. Both are also tolerant of a variety of levels of sunlight, although, to protect the beauty of their foliage from scorching, it is generally better to grow them in at least partial shade.

Learn about 19 types of ivy to grow, both in an out of the Hedera genus, plus how to get rid of one particularly unwelcome "ivy."

  • 01 of 19

    English Ivy (Hedera helix)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (4)

    English ivy is a fast-growing evergreen vine valued for its versatility. It can be grown in sun or shade (but shade is better, to avoid leaf scorching), including deep shade (as on the North wall of a building), which usually presents a problem for growing plants. Its vigorous growth habit makes it an effective ground cover where you need a patch of ground covered quickly. But it also sports aerial roots that allow it to scale a tree or that wall that you want covered in greenery. However, it can cause damage both to trees and siding (including brickwork), so select the host carefully.

    • Native Area:Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 9
    • Height:20 to 80 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to full shade

    Warning

    English ivy is considered an invasive species in some parts of North America. It is a tough plant that easily naturalizes outdoors.

    Continue to 2 of 19 below.

  • 02 of 19

    White-and-Green Variegated English Ivy (Hedera helix 'Glacier')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (5)

    The variegated cultivars of English ivy should generally be given a bit more sunlight than the types with all-green leaves to promote the white coloration in their leaves. At the southern end of its range, though, 'Glacier' should be given full shade to shelter it from the summer heat. This variegated cultivar of English ivy sports a center with patches of gray and green and edges that are a creamy white.

    • Native Area:Species native to Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 9
    • Height:2 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to partial shade
    (Video) English Ivy Plant: Keep it Happy

    Continue to 3 of 19 below.

  • 03 of 19

    Yellow-and-Green Variegated English Ivy (Hedera helix 'Gold Child')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (6)

    Your choices in variegated English ivy plants are not limited to the cultivars in green and white. The leaves of the 'Gold Child' cultivar are edged in gold. With this color pattern, the plant will remind you of another popular ground cover, 'Emerald and Gold' wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei). Like 'Glacier,' this variegated cultivar should be given full shade in the South to shelter it from the summer heat; give it a bit more sunlight in the North to promote the gold color.

    • Native Area:Species native to Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 9
    • Height:3 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to partial shade
  • 04 of 19

    Baltic Ivy (Hedera helix 'Baltica')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (7)

    Baltic ivy is very similar to English ivy, except that it has smaller leaves. Like other Hedera spp., its root system makes it a good choice when you need a ground cover for erosion control on steep hills.

    • Native Area:Species native to Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 9
    • Height:20 to 80 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to full shade

    Continue to 5 of 19 below.

  • 05 of 19

    Irish Ivy (Hedera hibernica)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (8)

    Whereas 'Baltica' has smaller leaves than English ivy, the Irish ivy has leaves that are larger than the latter. Also called "Atlantic Ivy," it naturalizes easily (especially in climates such as that of the Pacific Northwest) like the English, with which it also shares uses such as for erosion control (as a ground cover) and for covering walls.

    • Native Area:Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:5 to 9
    • Height:32 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    Continue to 6 of 19 below.

  • 06 of 19

    Persian Ivy (Hedera colchica)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (9)

    Persian ivy is a true ivy with oval-to-heart-shaped leaves. Not only is the leaf shape different from that of English ivy, but so is the size: a whopping 3 to 7 inches wide and up to 10 inches long. It has its own cultivars: including 'Dentata', 'Dentata Variegata', and 'Sulpher Heart'.

    All plants in the Hedera genus can be put to similar uses (ground covers, to cover walls, etc.), but one use you may not think of right away is for topiary. Typically, we associate topiaries with shrubs, but Hedera vines can also be trained to grow over frames to form animal shapes, etc. With its greater leaf size, Persian ivy can fill in a large topiary frame faster than English ivy.

    • Native Area:Western Caucasus, northern Turkey
    • USDA Growing Zones:6 to 9
    • Height:30 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial shade to full shade

    Continue to 7 of 19 below.

  • 07 of 19

    Algerian Ivy (Hedera canariensis)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (10)

    Another exotic true ivy is the Algerian. It bears glossy leaves (5 to 8 inches wide) that are composed of three to five shallow lobes. The leaves are more widely spaced along the stems than on English ivy, giving the plant a distinct look. But this vine isn't as cold-hardy as some ivies (only to zone 7).

    • Native Area:North Africa
    • USDA Growing Zones:7 to 11
    • Height:20 to 40 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to partial shade

    Continue to 8 of 19 below.

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  • 08 of 19

    Variegated Algerian Ivy (Hedera canariensis 'Gloire de Marengo')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (11)

    This variegated version of Algerian ivy has gray-green centers and creamy-white margins. Like other types of Hedera, it strikes down roots as it spreads along the ground and is reasonably drought-tolerant once established. Use it as a ground cover or wall covering where you want an eye-catching foliar display.

    • Native Area:Species native to North Africa
    • USDA Growing Zones:7 to 11
    • Height:1 to 2 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial sun to partial shade

    Warning

    Hedera spp. are toxic to pets.

    Continue to 9 of 19 below.

  • 09 of 19

    Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (12)

    Like Hedera spp., Parthenocissus spp. cling to just about any surface and tolerate shady conditions as well as sun. Also, like Hedera spp., they can be used as ground cover plants.

    Though not as risky to grow on walls as English ivy,Boston ivy can damage wood siding, gutters, and roofing. In most parts of North America, Boston ivy is a less aggressive grower than English ivy.

    But Boston ivy is a deciduous vine. It provides great red fall color; even in spring, the new leaves are reddish. The foliage morphs to green in summer before reverting to red in fall.

    • Native Area:Asia
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
    • Height:30 to 50 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial sun

    Continue to 10 of 19 below.

  • 10 of 19

    Fenway Park Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Fenway Park')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (13)

    This cultivar of Boston ivy differs from the species in leaf color. The foliage starts out golden in spring. In summer it morphs into a chartreuse green. The fall color is red, as with the species plant. In the North, give it as much sun as you can, which promotes its striking colors. But at the southern end of its range, it can profit from afternoon shade.

    • Native Area:Species native to Asia
    • USDA Growing Zones:4 to 8
    • Height:24 inches
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    Continue to 11 of 19 below.

  • 11 of 19

    Five-Leaved Ivy (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (14)

    Closely related to Boston ivy is five-leaved ivy (better known as "Virginia creeper"), but the latter is favored by native plant activists in North America. This large and vigorous vine is frequently encountered in its native North America growing wild along roadsides, in forests, and in people's backyards. It has outstanding fall color (red) and can be put to the same uses as Boston ivy and the Hedera genus.

    • Native Area:North America
    • USDA Growing Zones:3 to 10
    • Height:30 to 50 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    Continue to 12 of 19 below.

  • 12 of 19

    Variegated Ground Ivy (Glechoma hederacea 'Variegata')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (15)

    Glechoma hederacea is a widespread lawn weed in North America. It produces purple flowers and aromatic foliage, but most homeowners still try to get rid of it. The variegated version, however, is sold as an ornamental and is valued for its attractive leaves. Use it as an edging plant where an unusual specimen is called for.

    • Native Area:Species native to Europe
    • USDA Growing Zones:6 to 10
    • Height:14 inches
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial sun

    Continue to 13 of 19 below.

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  • 13 of 19

    Tree Ivy (× Fatshedera lizei)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (16)

    Tree ivy is a cross between a shrub and English ivy. It gets its glossy, dark green, five-lobed evergreen leaves from its English ivy parent. But thisperennialgets its shrubby habit from its other parent. You can buy variegated cultivars such as 'Variegata' if you want more striking foliage.

    • Native Area:Hybrid
    • USDA Growing Zones:7 to 10
    • Height:3 to 5 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial shade

    Continue to 14 of 19 below.

  • 14 of 19

    Ivy Geranium (Pelargonium peltatum)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (17)

    Ivy geranium is popular in the North as a plant for hanging baskets and window boxes. Not only is it not a true ivy, but it isn't even a true geranium. What we commonly call a "geranium" is actually a Pelargonium, a type of annual. By contrast, true geraniums are perennials. Regardless, ivy geraniums are showy plants well worth growing outdoors during the summer months in cold climates. The foliage is glossy and the flowers (which come in pink, white, and lilac, besides red) are striking; red-flowered types will be most effective if you're looking to draw attention to a planter.

    • Native Area:South Africa
    • USDA Growing Zones:10 to 11
    • Height:12 to 18 inches
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    Continue to 15 of 19 below.

  • 15 of 19

    Swedish Ivy (Plectranthus australis)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (18)

    Swedish ivy is grown as a houseplant in the North, where it is also popular for hanging baskets displayed on porches and patios in the summertime. You can make your Swedish ivy a bushier, more compact plant by pinching it regularly. Such a regimen helps this herbaceous perennial develop new branches. And the vine is soft enough that pinching is very easy.

    • Native Area:South Africa
    • USDA Growing Zones:10 to 11
    • Height:2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial shade

    Continue to 16 of 19 below.

  • 16 of 19

    Variegated Swedish Ivy (Plectranthus australis 'Variegata')

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (19)

    While the species plant is valued for its glossy, bright-green leaves, this variegated cultivar is prized for its rich-green centers edged in a creamy white. The variegated version is more likely to stand out in a mixed planter, with its eye-catching contrast of green and white, than is the species plant.

    • Native Area:Species native to South Africa
    • USDA Growing Zones:10 to 11
    • Height:2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial shade

    Continue to 17 of 19 below.

  • 17 of 19

    Devil's Ivy (Epipremnum aureum)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (20)

    Better known as pothos, devil's ivy is another tender plant commonly grown as a houseplant in the North, especially in hanging baskets. Several cultivars exist including white-and-green types like 'Marble Queen' and 'Pearls and Jade', a silver option called 'Silver Satin', and the chartreuse 'Neon'.

    It is valued as one of the easiest houseplants to grow, so it's a great choice if you like low maintenance and/or are not a "green thumb."

    • Native Area:South Pacific
    • USDA Growing Zones:10 to 12
    • Height:20 to 40 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    Warning

    Pothos is toxic to pets.

    Continue to 18 of 19 below.

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  • 18 of 19

    Grape Ivy (Cissus alata)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (21)

    Like Swedish ivy and devil's ivy, grape ivy is a tender plant usually grown as a houseplant in the North. Alternatively, grow it in a hanging basket for the deck during the summertime. It is a good climber, so you can also grow it on a small trellis indoors. Being well-adapted to low light conditions, it is easy to grow as a houseplant.

    • Native Area:Central America, South America
    • USDA Growing Zones:10 to 12
    • Height:6 to 10 feet
    • Sun Exposure:Partial shade

    Warning

    Cissus, Epipremnum, Glechoma, Hedera, and Parthenocissus all have some levels of toxicity to humans.

    Continue to 19 of 19 below.

  • 19 of 19

    German Ivy (Delairea odorata)

    19 Types of Ivy to Grow in Your Yard (22)

    German ivy doesn't always bloom, but, when it does, it's spectacular. More typically, in the northern United States, it is valued simply for its foliage. It is commonly grown in hanging baskets outdoors in the summer. But it is also a popular houseplant. In fact, because it naturalizes easily in warm climates and can be invasive there, many recommend growing it exclusively as a houseplant. Its leaves are interesting not only because of their jagged edges, but also because they are large (up to 4 inches). As with Hedera spp., the plant requires more care when grown indoors rather than outdoors.

    • Native Area:South Africa, where it is evergreen
    • USDA Growing Zones:9 to 12
    • Height:2 feet (longer in its native area)
    • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade

    FAQ

    • Is ivy easy to care for?

      When an ivy is suited for growing outdoors in your region, then the best way to stay low-maintenance in growing ivy is to grow it outdoors. When grown indoors, ivy needs more attention.

    • How fast does ivy grow?

      Most types of ivy grow rapidly outdoors. They will generally grow slower indoors. English ivy, for example, can take a year or more to become established and experience a growth spurt when grown indoors.

    • What is "poison ivy?"

      One ivy you will want to avoid altogether is Toxicodendron radicans, the infamous "poison ivy." This North-American native isn't really an ivy at all. Rather, it's considered one of our biggest nuisance plants. Here's how to remove it safely from your land.

The Spruce uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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FAQs

What is the easiest ivy to grow outside? ›

Himalayan Ivy

This easy-growing species needs full shade or partial sun to thrive in your garden. If you're planning to use Himalayan ivy as a ground cover or on a trellis outside, plant this ivy on the northern or eastern side of your home to protect it from the bright afternoon sun.

How many types of ivy is there? ›

What is the best ivy plant for outdoors? ›

Hedera and Parthenocissus are the two most widely grown ivies in landscaping. The major difference between them is that types of the former are evergreen, while types of the latter are deciduous and give you great fall color. Both do best in fertile, moist soil that drains well.

What is the most common type of ivy? ›

While there are multiple variants of Ivy, the English ivy stands out as the most common type. This variant of the plant is widely found across brick walls, with wide stems bearing three to five lobes.

What is the hardiest outdoor ivy? ›

Hedera helix 'Thorndale' is described as the hardiest ivy. Plant in full sun, partial shade or full shade in well drained soil. Hedera Throndale adapts to most soil types well and tolerates short periods of drought. 'Thorndale' can be used as a ground cover or trained to climb on vertical surfaces.

What ivy stays green all year? ›

English Ivy Basics

Notes: English ivy is a vigorous climbing vine that retains its glossy green leaves all year long. It can be used as a ground cover in shady areas and kept in check with a line trimmer, or it can be trained to climb walls and arbors.

What ivy grows over everything? ›

English Ivy

This plant, which is considered invasive in many states, can cause serious problems. While it's appreciated for its ability to cover ground quickly, this vine also climbs.

What is the prettiest ivy plant? ›

1. Hedera helix “Arborescens” This beautiful glossy-leaved ivy is somewhat unusual in that it doesn't climb. Instead, it forms dense clumps with masses of green-white flowers which appear in late summer.

What is the easiest ivy to keep alive? ›

Pothos. Pothos is a vine that is known as one of the easiest plants to take care of because it can survive little sunlight and over or underwatering. It's also known as “devil's ivy” because it just won't die.

What is the best ivy for ground coverage? ›

Native to Europe, English ivy (Hedera helix) is a widespread, evergreen ground cover that thrives in the shade. This plant is popular for its attractive foliage and rapid spread, which helps it fill areas faster than other ground covers.

What ivy can take full sun? ›

Boston ivy does best in full-sun locations. Although full sun produces the best fall color, it can be too much for the vine to handle in warm climates; the leaves could scorch.

What is the sweetest ivy plant? ›

Swedish Ivy plant - will someone please acknowledge it has the sweetest, gentlest, best fragrance of all - emitted from the leaves themselves!

What is the most aggressive ivy? ›

Unfortunately, English Ivy (Hedera helix) is one of the most pernicious, nasty, and destructive of the invasive plants because it not only destroys native habitat, it can also destroy your house. That is why I've added English Ivy to the Most Hated Plants list.

Which ivy is least invasive? ›

Wild-harvested is always best, but if you must plant it, the only responsible choice is the non-invasive sterile variety 'Woerneri'.

What kind of ivy is used in landscaping? ›

English ivy (Hedera helix) is a non-native woody, perennial vine that has been used extensively in landscapes, primarily as a ground cover. English ivy reproduces from seed that is dispersed by birds when they eat the fruit. It can also spread vegetatively and can root from cut vines or stems.

What is the fastest growing ivy? ›

Persian ivy (Hedera colchica) is one of the fastest-growing types of ivy.

Why is common ivy bad? ›

Once established in an area, English ivy is very costly and labor intensive to eradicate. English ivy can overrun your garden, climb fences, and invade your neighbor's yard and nearby natural areas. The leaves and fruit of English ivy are toxic to humans and livestock and the sap can irritate skin.

What kind of ivy stays green all winter? ›

English ivy (Hedera helix) keeps its dark green color all winter; the vines can grow as a thick groundcover. But be careful where you plant; this ivy is aggressive enough to climb trees and crowd out native plants.

What is the lifespan of ivy? ›

Once established juvenile plants can live up to 10 years before reaching maturation. English ivy plants can live up to 100 years or longer with one plant in England being documented at more than 400 years in age.

What ivy turns red in the winter? ›

In cold weather, poison ivy leaves turn deep red, then shrivel and fall off.

What kills ivy from growing? ›

Glyphosate: Ivy is not easily controlled by means of weedkiller sprays, partly due to the very glossy, moisture-resistant nature of its leaf surface. In this situation it is best to try the tough formulations of glyphosate (e.g. Roundup Ultra or Rootblast Super Strength Weedkiller).

Does ivy like miracle grow? ›

Ivies like their soil a little on the acidic side, with an ideal soil pH being between 5.5 and 6.5, but something like Miracle-Gro Indoor Potting Mix will do fine.

What plants choke out ivy? ›

For good ground covering plants to replace your ground covering English ivy, try blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) or tussock sedge (Carex stricta). If the English ivy vines are what you are looking for, you might consider Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) or trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans).

Which ivy is the least expensive? ›

Which Ivy League School Is the Cheapest?
  • Cornell University, $66,834 – $88,150. ...
  • Harvard College, $82,950 – $87,450. ...
  • Princeton University, $83,140. ...
  • Columbia University, $85,967. ...
  • Brown University, $87,648. ...
  • Yale University, $87,705. ...
  • Dartmouth College, $87,793. ...
  • University of Pennsylvania, $89,028.
May 2, 2023

What kills ivy the best? ›

The experts recommend filling a spray bottle with your solution (apple cider vinegar, dish soap, and one tablespoon of salt) and spraying the mixture onto your ivy plants thoroughly. 'The vinegar and salt are the agents that attack the ivy the most,' Jeremy explains.

Does ivy need full sun or shade? ›

Most cultivars of ivy grow best in bright light, but not direct sun. They tolerate low to medium light, but growth is reduced and variegated forms may turn all green. To maintain the bright color of a variegated ivy, give it plenty of light.

What is the best time to plant ivy? ›

Autumn and spring are the best planting times. Water well during the first year and mulch to keep down competitive weeds. As a ground cover, English ivy grows in difficult spots where other plants would fail.

Where is the best place to plant ivy? ›

English ivy grows in sun or shade, and in any soil as long as it's not waterlogged or highly acidic. Vigorous cultivars with large leaves can be used to rapidly hide eyesores, while variegated varieties are useful for brightening shady areas. English ivy can also be used as ground cover in dry shade.

What is the fastest growing ground cover plant? ›

Asiatic Jasmine. This fast-growing ground cover is a great option for warm climates. The stunning, dense, evergreen foliage grows close to the ground, so it's an ideal plant to cover up bare spots around and underneath trees and shrubs.

How hot is too hot for ivy? ›

Ivy doesn't like hot temperatures. A temperature range between 10°C (50°F) - 18°C (65°F) is really what it wants. Warmer temperatures over a prolonged period will cause problems in the long term.

Does ivy like hot sun? ›

Growing well almost anywhere, ivies are remarkable for their shade tolerance – and for the fact that they also grow well in full sun. They make excellent groundcover, quickly covering difficult areas such as dry shade, stabilising the soil and providing year-round greenery.

Can I grow ivy from a cutting? ›

One of the easiest plants to propagate, the ivy can be propagated by anyone with a pair of scissors to take cuttings. Simply take 4 to 5 inch long cuttings of the plant, with at least 3 to 4 leaf nodes. Plant the cuttings in a moist potting mix or propagate in water.

Is ivy bad for your yard? ›

Many people use English ivy as decorations in their gardens because of its pretty "climbing" appearance and color. However, the plant isn't native to our state and can easily become invasive. English ivy has the ability to spread rapidly and take over your entire yard, killing off your other plants.

Why is ground ivy bad? ›

Ground ivy is not so pretty when you learn it contains a volatile, aromatic oil and a bitter chemical substance. This is especially harmful for animals put out to pasture. If farmers don't notice the ivy, animals could potentially eat the poisonous weed.

What is the strong smelling ivy? ›

Ground ivy plants emit a strong mint-like odor when crushed, mowed, or simply walked upon. Some love this smell, while some hate this smell. Stems are square (four-sided). The flowers are small, lavender to purplish blue, funnel shaped, and clustered in leaf axils.

What is the non harmful ivy? ›

Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) - Virginia creeper is taller and less dense than English ivy, but looks beautiful under trees. It will grow up trees without harming them because it is deciduous.

What ground cover ivy doesn t climb? ›

There are a few varieties that are perpetually in their adult phase, such as Hedera helix 'Arborescens' and 'Ice Cream' and H. colchica 'Arborescens'. These remain as bushy, non-climbing forms and flower every year. Essentially, they are small shrubs.

Why is English ivy a problem? ›

What is the Impact of English Ivy on the Environment? English ivy's most dangerous attribute is that it vines up and chokes trees. Not only does this prevent photosynthesis from happening by blocking foliage from sunlight, but it also damages tree bark by holding moisture against the trunk.

How do I grow ivy in my backyard? ›

Most varieties can be planted to climb or as ground cover; simply select a spot with adequate light requirements (depending on the variety, it will need partial sun or shade), dig into nutrient-rich soil (take note: ivy doesn't thrive in clay soil), and place the root ball of the ivy into the ground.

How do I grow ivy in my lawn? ›

Ivy prefers to be kept slightly on the dry side, so let the soil dry out some (dry to the touch on top) before you water your ivy plants again. Indoor or outdoor ivy prefers evenly moist but not soggy soil. Also, make sure that your plant has excellent drainage.

Which ivy is the easiest to get into? ›

Cornell is considered the "easiest" Ivy League to get into because it has the highest Ivy League acceptance rate. While it's easier, statistically speaking, to get into Cornell, it's still challenging. It's also important to remember that students apply directly to one of Cornell's eight undergraduate colleges.

What is the easiest ivy to take care of? ›

English ivy is relatively easy to care for and looks great, either hanging or dangling its vines from a shelf. It can even be trained to grow up a topiary. If you're ready to add this classic vine to your home, here is what you need to know about growing ivy indoors.

Does ivy grow well outside? ›

All ivy will grow fairly well at room temperature, and in fact ivy topiaries are common indoor plants. However, they prefer outdoor conditions, so plan to keep them outside in the garden at least 25 percent of the time, or as much as possible. They prefer the moister environments outdoors.

Which is the prettiest Ivy? ›

The Ivy League with the best campus is Princeton. It's reputed as having the prettiest campus.

Which Ivy is the least expensive? ›

Which Ivy League School Is the Cheapest?
  • Cornell University, $66,834 – $88,150. ...
  • Harvard College, $82,950 – $87,450. ...
  • Princeton University, $83,140. ...
  • Columbia University, $85,967. ...
  • Brown University, $87,648. ...
  • Yale University, $87,705. ...
  • Dartmouth College, $87,793. ...
  • University of Pennsylvania, $89,028.
May 2, 2023

What is the most competitive Ivy? ›

Harvard University

The most challenging Ivy League school to get into is Harvard, established in 1636 and based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. According to Harvard Admissions, only 2,008 out of 43,330 candidates were accepted to the college. These figures translate into an acceptance rate of 4.6%.

What kills ivy the fastest? ›

Glyphosate: Ivy is not easily controlled by means of weedkiller sprays, partly due to the very glossy, moisture-resistant nature of its leaf surface. In this situation it is best to try the tough formulations of glyphosate (e.g. Roundup Ultra or Rootblast Super Strength Weedkiller).

Why not to plant ivy? ›

The excess weight of English ivy may cause additional damage to trees during winter storms. English ivy can also affect local wildlife by displacing the plants they depend on. English ivy has invaded California and the northwestern United States and is particularly a problem in regions near the coast.

What is the best ivy for ground cover? ›

English ivy (Hedera helix) is a non-native woody, perennial vine that has been used extensively in landscapes, primarily as a ground cover. English ivy reproduces from seed that is dispersed by birds when they eat the fruit. It can also spread vegetatively and can root from cut vines or stems.

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